Amanda’s Picks: Oscars 2022 Predictions

Happy Oscar Sunday everyone! After what feels like a very long Oscar season, we are finally ready to award some great films. Truly never thought this season would be over. I am very happy for all the nominees this year because there are some films that would normally fly under the radar and now they are getting recognition.

WHO WILL WIN WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED IN GOLD

WHO I WANT TO WIN WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED IN PURPLE

Best Picture

“Belfast,” (WANT TO)
Laura Berwick, Kenneth Branagh, Becca Kovacik and Tamar Thomas, producers

“CODA,”
Philippe Rousselet, Fabrice Gianfermi and Patrick Wachsberger, producers

“Don’t Look Up,”
Adam McKay and Kevin Messick, producers

“Drive My Car,”
Teruhisa Yamamoto, producer

“Dune,”
Mary Parent, Denis Villeneuve and Cale Boyter, producers

“King Richard,”
Tim White, Trevor White and Will Smith, producers

“Licorice Pizza,”
Sara Murphy, Adam Somner and Paul Thomas Anderson, producers

“Nightmare Alley,”
Guillermo del Toro, J. Miles Dale and Bradley Cooper, producers

“The Power of the Dog,” (WILL WIN)
Jane Campion, Tanya Seghatchian, Emile Sherman, Iain Canning and Roger Frappier, producers

“West Side Story,”
Steven Spielberg and Kristie Macosko Krieger, producers

Best Director

Kenneth Branagh (“Belfast”) (WANT TO)

Ryûsuke Hamaguchi (“Drive My Car”)

Paul Thomas Anderson (“Licorice Pizza”)

Jane Campion (“The Power of the Dog”) (WILL WIN)

Steven Spielberg (“West Side Story”)

Best Lead Actor

Javier Bardem (“Being the Ricardos”)

Benedict Cumberbatch (“The Power of the Dog”)

Andrew Garfield (“Tick, Tick … Boom!”) (WANT TO)

Will Smith (“King Richard”) (WILL WIN)

Denzel Washington (“The Tragedy of Macbeth”)

Best Lead Actress

Jessica Chastain (“The Eyes of Tammy Faye”) (WILL WIN)

Olivia Colman (“The Lost Daughter”)

Penélope Cruz (“Parallel Mothers”)

Nicole Kidman (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kristen Stewart (“Spencer”) (WANT TO)

Best Supporting Actor

Ciarán Hinds (“Belfast”)

Troy Kotsur (“CODA”) (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

Jesse Plemons (“The Power of the Dog”)

J.K. Simmons (“Being the Ricardos”)

Kodi Smit-McPhee (“The Power of the Dog”)

Best Supporting Actress

Jessie Buckley (“The Lost Daughter”)

Ariana DeBose (“West Side Story”) (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

Judi Dench (“Belfast”)

Kirsten Dunst (“The Power of the Dog”)

Aunjanue Ellis (“King Richard”)

Best Adapted Screenplay

“CODA,” screenplay by Siân Heder

“Drive My Car,” screenplay by Ryusuke Hamaguchi, Takamasa Oe (SHOULD WIN)

“Dune,” screenplay by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve and Eric Roth

“The Lost Daughter,” written by Maggie Gyllenhaal

“The Power of the Dog,” written by Jane Campion (WILL WIN)

Best Original Screenplay

“Belfast,” written by Kenneth Branagh

“Don’t Look Up,” screenplay by Adam McKay; story by Adam McKay and David Sirota

“King Richard,” written by Zach Baylin

“Licorice Pizza,” written by Paul Thomas Anderson (WILL WIN)

“The Worst Person in the World,” written by Eskil Vogt, Joachim Trier (SHOULD WIN)

Best Cinematography

“Dune,” Greig Fraser (WILL WIN)

“Nightmare Alley,” Dan Laustsen

“The Power of the Dog,” Ari Wegner (SHOULD WIN)

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” Bruno Delbonnel

“West Side Story,” Janusz Kaminski

Best Animated Feature Film

“Encanto,” Jared Bush, Byron Howard, Yvett Merino and Clark Spencer (WILL WIN)

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie

“Luca,” Enrico Casarosa and Andrea Warren

“The Mitchells vs. the Machines,” Mike Rianda, Phil Lord, Christopher Miller and Kurt Albrecht (SHOULD WIN)

“Raya and the Last Dragon,” Don Hall, Carlos López Estrada, Osnat Shurer and Peter Del Vecho

Best Animated Short Film

“Affairs of the Art,” Joanna Quinn and Les Mills

“Bestia,” Hugo Covarrubias and Tevo Díaz (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“Boxballet,” Anton Dyakov

“Robin Robin,” Dan Ojari and Mikey Please

“The Windshield Wiper,” Alberto Mielgo and Leo Sanchez

Best Costume Design

“Cruella,” Jenny Beavan (WILL WIN)

“Cyrano,” Massimo Cantini Parrini and Jacqueline Durran

“Dune,” Jacqueline West and Robert Morgan (SHOULD WIN)

“Nightmare Alley,” Luis Sequeira

“West Side Story,” Paul Tazewell

Best Original Score

“Don’t Look Up,” Nicholas Britell

“Dune,” Hans Zimmer (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“Encanto,” Germaine Franco

“Parallel Mothers,” Alberto Iglesias

“The Power of the Dog,” Jonny Greenwood

Best Sound

“Belfast,” Denise Yarde, Simon Chase, James Mather and Niv Adiri

“Dune,” Mac Ruth, Mark Mangini, Theo Green, Doug Hemphill and Ron Bartlett (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“No Time to Die,” Simon Hayes, Oliver Tarney, James Harrison, Paul Massey and Mark Taylor

“The Power of the Dog,” Richard Flynn, Robert Mackenzie and Tara Webb

“West Side Story,” Tod A. Maitland, Gary Rydstrom, Brian Chumney, Andy Nelson and Shawn Murphy

Best Original Song

“Be Alive” from “King Richard,” music and lyric by Dixson and Beyoncé Knowles-Carter (SHOULD WIN)

“Dos Oruguitas” from “Encanto,” music and lyric by Lin-Manuel Miranda

“Down To Joy” from “Belfast,” music and lyric by Van Morrison

“No Time To Die” from “No Time to Die,” music and lyric by Billie Eilish and Finneas O’Connell (WILL WIN)

“Somehow You Do” from “Four Good Days,” music and lyric by Diane Warren

Best Documentary Feature

“Ascension,” Jessica Kingdon, Kira Simon-Kennedy and Nathan Truesdell

“Attica,” Stanley Nelson and Traci A. Curry

“Flee,” Jonas Poher Rasmussen, Monica Hellström, Signe Byrge Sørensen and Charlotte De La Gournerie (WILL WIN)

“Summer of Soul (…Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised),” Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Joseph Patel, Robert Fyvolent and David Dinerstein (SHOULD WIN)

“Writing With Fire,” Rintu Thomas and Sushmit Ghosh

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Audible,” Matt Ogens and Geoff McLean

“Lead Me Home,” Pedro Kos and Jon Shenk

“The Queen of Basketball,” Ben Proudfoot (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“Three Songs for Benazir,” Elizabeth Mirzaei and Gulistan Mirzaei

“When We Were Bullies,” Jay Rosenblatt

Best Film Editing

“Don’t Look Up,” Hank Corwin

“Dune,” Joe Walker (SHOULD WIN)

“King Richard”, Pamela Martin

“The Power of the Dog,” Peter Sciberras (WILL WIN)

“Tick, Tick…Boom!” Myron Kerstein and Andrew Weisblum

Best International Feature Film

“Drive My Car” (Japan) (SHOULD WIN)

“Flee” (Denmark)

“The Hand of God” (Italy)

“Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom” (Bhutan)

“The Worst Person in the World” (Norway) (WILL WIN)

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Coming 2 America,” Mike Marino, Stacey Morris and Carla Farmer

“Cruella,” Nadia Stacey, Naomi Donne and Julia Vernon

“Dune,” Donald Mowat, Love Larson and Eva von Bahr

“The Eyes of Tammy Faye,” Linda Dowds, Stephanie Ingram and Justin Raleigh (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“House of Gucci,” Göran Lundström, Anna Carin Lock and Frederic Aspiras

Best Production Design

“Dune,” production design: Patrice Vermette; set decoration: Zsuzsanna Sipos (WILL WIN)

“Nightmare Alley,” production design: Tamara Deverell; set decoration: Shane Vieau (SHOULD WIN)

“The Power of the Dog,” production design: Grant Major; set decoration: Amber Richards

“The Tragedy of Macbeth,” production design: Stefan Dechant; set decoration: Nancy Haigh

“West Side Story,” production design: Adam Stockhausen; set decoration: Rena DeAngelo

Best Visual Effects

“Dune,” Paul Lambert, Tristan Myles, Brian Connor and Gerd Nefzer (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“Free Guy,” Swen Gillberg, Bryan Grill, Nikos Kalaitzidis and Dan Sudick

“No Time to Die,” Charlie Noble, Joel Green, Jonathan Fawkner and Chris Corbould

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” Christopher Townsend, Joe Farrell, Sean Noel Walker and Dan Oliver

“Spider-Man: No Way Home,” Kelly Port, Chris Waegner, Scott Edelstein and Dan Sudick

Best Live Action Short Film

“Ala Kachuu – Take and Run,” Maria Brendle and Nadine Lüchinger

“The Dress,” Tadeusz Łysiak and Maciej Ślesicki

“The Long Goodbye,” Aneil Karia and Riz Ahmed (WILL AND SHOULD WIN)

“On My Mind,” Martin Strange-Hansen and Kim Magnusson

“Please Hold,” K.D. Dávila and Levin Menekse

Oscar-Nominated Short Film ‘Bestia’ Review

By: Amanda Guarragi

What works the most with animation is an obscure story that can only be told through the use of imagination. There is so much that works through the lens of stop-motion animation, or any form of animation. Specifically, in Bestia we find ourselves connected with the lead character Ingrid, which is a porcelain doll, as she is lost in her own thoughts while travelling. There’s a small hole in her temple that symbolizes so much as the story progresses. Ingrid is a secret police agent working during the Chilean military dictatorship. Director Hugo Covarrubias shows the duality of one’s imagination when trying to keep stories straight.

It is always difficult to know everyone’s secrets while maintaining some sort of sanity. Especially when it comes to going undercover. Ingrid battles with her own mind and her career as the lines between her reality and nightmares blur because of the situation she’s in. As she continues her duty as a secret police agent, there are these really dark moments that she has with her dog. Some of the images are very obscure, others really concerning, but it does show how she is slowly breaking down. It almost felt like she was spiralling. There were normal moments that she shared during the day with her dog, but then at night, those pure moments of repetitive daily life turned into night terrors.

In a way, Covarrubias showed how people lived during the dictatorship. How even though there are these difficult moments filled with sorrow, there can always be a silver lining to the day. Almost like a fresh start; a new beginning to each day. There can be a positive way to look at Bestia even through all the darkness, but it makes sense to turn the page and understand how broken Ingrid’s mind became because of her work. The stop-motion animation allowed Covarrubias to explore this story on a different emotional level. He chose to show how broken the system was in Chile, while also showing how it broke the people living there at the same time.

Bestia is a stop-motion animated short film that explores the Chilean dictatorship and how the people who lived through it felt. If you view the emotional connection to Ingrid in an abstract way, you can see the gravity of the situation. Ingrid’s mind was being shattered because of everything that was happening and her need for normalcy. It’s a different way to use stop-motion animation and there is always an appreciation for it because animation can visually show something more than live-action can. It’s more experimental and can leave certain imagery to be interpreted by the viewer. Even though some images can be unsettling, it’s a very interesting watch and it places the importance on mental health.

Oscar-Nominated Short Film ‘Ala Kachuu’ Review And Interview With Director Maria Brendle

By: Amanda Guarragi

There comes a time in every woman’s life that defines them. That one moment where they realize the woman they want to become is in reach if they just keep pushing forward. However, different cultures value marriage and are set within their conditioned gender roles. Sometimes the traditional notion of being a housewife and dedicating your life to your husband and children can also seem like a loss of agency. In Maria Brendle’s Ala Kachuu she explores the difference in generations and the conditioned ideal of womanhood. As generations of women explore and evolve, the meaning of motherhood and female individuality change to the dismay of the previous generation.

We meet Sezim (Alina Turdumamatova), who wants to fulfil her dream of studying in the Kyrgyz capital. She abruptly gets kidnapped by a group of young men and then she is forced to marry a stranger. If she refuses the marriage, she is threatened with social stigmatization and exclusion. This is actually a tradition in South Asian countries and not many people know about it,

“It was so important for me when I learned about bride kidnapping and I learned that only a few people in the world knew about this tradition. And it was so important for me to give the victims of the war a voice and create awareness of this topic.”

– Director Maria Brendle, Ala Kachuu

This is still stripping a woman’s right to choose. It’s a heartbreaking story and the way Brendle presented it on screen was difficult to watch at times. You can feel Sezim slowly slip into despair, as the only good thing she had was her education. Once she does get kidnapped, we see a very different side of her. She does not know how to process any of this and why it’s even happening in the first place.

What was so interesting to see is how the difference in generation forms two ideas about how a woman should conduct herself. The elders believe that a woman is destined for marriage and to bear children. Due to the fact that education wasn’t as accessible to them, their mind-set is completely different,

“I think it’s important that each girl and woman in the world should support each other. This is very important for all of us. I learned in Kyrgyzstan, there’s a lot of female tradition. So a mother can say no when the son is bringing in a girl for marriage by kidnapping. I think it’s important to cut this cycle. Women must stand together and fight for their rights.”

Director Maria Brendle, Ala Kachuu

When Sezim sees that her friend has moved out of their village and she is living by making her own decisions, she dives headfirst into her schooling. She believes that education can definitely pull her out of this traditional lifestyle. Instead of changing the narrative, Brendle sits in the brutal truth about the women struggling through these traditions. She shows how damaging it can be to their mental state and how hopeless the situation might feel. The one thing Brendle does show is Sezim’s resilience and strength to push through this horrible period for her.

Ala Kachuu brings awareness to a subject that isn’t really touched upon in Western culture. It’s important to bring these stories to the forefront in the most authentic way possible, so everyone can understand how women are still being treated in other cultures. Maria Brendle hopes that by using her voice and her platform, her film can raise awareness in order to protect and save these young girls. Brendle is overwhelmed and humbled by the reception. This story is important and hopefully this can unite women everywhere in order to change these traditions and fight for a woman’s right to choose.

Amanda’s Picks: Oscars 2021 Predictions

Happy Oscar Sunday everyone! After a very long Oscar season, we are finally ready to award some great films. Truly never thought this season would be over. The work never stops though because we are always planning for the next season. I am very happy for all the nominees this year because there are some films that would normally fly under the radar and now they are getting recognition.

WHO WILL WIN WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED IN GOLD

WHO SHOULD WIN WILL BE HIGHLIGHTED IN PURPLE

So without further ado, here are my predictions:

Best Visual Effects

“Love and Monsters”

“The Midnight Sky”

“Mulan”

“The One and Only Ivan”

“Tenet”

PREDICTION: Tenet is the clear frontrunner here because of the practical effects. Love and Monsters is also something that could come in and swipe that away.

Best Director

Thomas Vinterberg (“Another Round”)

David Fincher (“Mank”) 

Lee Isaac Chung (“Minari”) 

Chloé Zhao (“Nomadland”) 

Emerald Fennell (“Promising Young Woman”) 

PREDICTION: Chloé Zhao has been sweeping award season and there is no doubt about it that she will be making history tonight with this win.

Best Actor in a Supporting Role

Sacha Baron Cohen (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”) 

Daniel Kaluuya (“Judas and the Black Messiah”) 

Leslie Odom Jr. (“One Night in Miami”

Paul Raci (“Sound of Metal”) 

Lakeith Stanfield (“Judas and the Black Messiah”)

PREDICTION: Daniel Kaluuya hands down. His performance in Judas and the Black Messiah is one for the history books.

Best Actress in a Supporting Role

Maria Bakalova (‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm”) 

Glenn Close (“Hillbilly Elegy”) 

Olivia Colman (“The Father”) 

Amanda Seyfried (“Mank”) 

Yuh-jung Youn (“Minari”) 

PREDICTION: Yuh-jung Youn has had an incredible award season and her performance stole my heart!

Best Actor in a Leading Role

Riz Ahmed (“Sound of Metal”) 

Chadwick Boseman (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) 

Anthony Hopkins (“The Father”) 

Gary Oldman (“Mank”) 

Steven Yeun (“Minari”) 

PREDICTION: Chadwick Boseman is going to win and deserves to win because his performance was on another level this year. It was incredibly moving and very emotional. You could feel his passion for the words through the physicality in his performance.

Best Animated Feature Film

“Onward” (Pixar) 

“Over the Moon” (Netflix) 

“A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon” (Netflix) 

“Soul” (Pixar) 

“Wolfwalkers” (Apple TV Plus/GKIDS) 

PREDICTION: Soul is the obvious frontrunner because it is a beautiful Pixar film and the animation is stunning. However, Wolfwalkers is unique and there is an appreciation for the three-dimensional hand-drawn elements in its animaton. So it is a close one.

Best Actress in a Leading Role

Viola Davis (“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”) 

Andra Day (“The United States v. Billie Holiday”) 

Vanessa Kirby (“Pieces of a Woman”) 

Frances McDormand (“Nomadland”) 

Carey Mulligan (“Promising Young Woman”) 

Prediction: This is such a tough category and it is impossible to predict this year! I would be happy with either Davis or Mulligan winning but the edge on Mulligan.

Best Adapted Screenplay

“Borat Subsequent Moviefilm.”
Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen, Anthony Hines, Dan Swimer, Peter Baynham, Erica Rivinoja, Dan Mazer, Jena Friedman, Lee Kern; Story by Sacha Baron Cohen, Anthony Hines, Dan Swimer, Nina Pedrad

“The Father,”
Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller

“Nomadland,”
Chloé Zhao 

“One Night in Miami,”
Kemp Powers 

“The White Tiger,”
Ramin Bahrani 

PREDICTION: The Father had a very strong script but I personally don’t think the execution elevated it at all. One Night in Miami is dialogue heavy and keeps you engaged from beginning to end.

Best Original Screenplay

“Judas and the Black Messiah.”
Screenplay by Will Berson, Shaka King; Story by Will Berson, Shaka King, Kenny Lucas, Keith Lucas

“Minari,”
Lee Isaac Chung 

“Promising Young Woman,”
Emerald Fennell 

“Sound of Metal.”
Screenplay by Darius Marder, Abraham Marder; Story by Darius Marder, Derek Cianfrance

“The Trial of the Chicago 7,”
Aaron Sorkin 

PREDICTION: The TOUGHEST category because they are all strong in their own way. Since Emerald Fennell has been getting traction off her WGA win, it’s only fair to assume that she has sealed the deal. Personally Judas and the Black Messiah had an incredible screenplay because of how intricate the story was and the dialogue.

Best Original Song

“Fight for You,” (“Judas and the Black Messiah”).
Music by H.E.R. and Dernst Emile II; Lyric by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas

“Hear My Voice,” (“The Trial of the Chicago 7”). 
Music by Daniel Pemberton; Lyric by Daniel Pemberton and Celeste Waite

“Húsavík,” (“Eurovision Song Contest”)
Music and Lyric by Savan Kotecha, Fat Max Gsus and Rickard Göransson

“Io Si (Seen),” (“The Life Ahead”). 
Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Diane Warren and Laura Pausini

“Speak Now,” (“One Night in Miami”). 
Music and Lyric by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth

PREDICTION: Solely because of its Golden Globe win it is entirely possible that they follow suit. However, Leslie Odom Jr. created a beautiful song for One Night in Miami and if this movie wins anything, it needs to be this category.

Best Picture

“The Father”

“Judas and the Black Messiah”

“Mank”

“Minari” (SHOULD WIN)

“Nomadland” (WILL WIN)

“Promising Young Woman”

“Sound of Metal”

“The Trial of the Chicago 7″

PREDICTION: Nomadland has become the Oscar darling but it is not a well-rounded film. The technical aspects are the most important part of the film but the story was lacking. Minari was a well-rounded all American film with a beautiful family dynamic and it should be the winner this year.

Best Original Score

“Da 5 Bloods,” Terence Blanchard 

“Mank,” Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross 

“Minari,” Emile Mosseri 

“News of the World,” James Newton Howard 

“Soul,” Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross, Jon Batiste 

PREDICTION: Soul has it in the bag because of the mixture of jazz and electronic dance music. Truly some of Reznor and Ross’ best work.

Best Sound

“Greyhound”

“Mank”

“News of the World”

“Soul”

“Sound of Metal”

PREDICTION: Sound of Metal is a lock because of how they switched the frequency when Reuben was losing his hearing. You could understand what he was going through because you could heard the shift. Incredible work.

Best Costume Design

“Emma”

“Mank”

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”

“Mulan”

“Pinocchio”

PREDICTION: Realistically the competition is between Ma Rainey’s and Emma because they are period pieces and they looked beautiful on-screen. Do not keep Mank out of the conversation because it is old Hollywood glam.

Best Animated Short Film

“Burrow” (Disney Plus/Pixar)

“Genius Loci” (Kazak Productions) 

“If Anything Happens I Love You” (Netflix) 

“Opera” (Beasts and Natives Alike) 

“Yes-People” (CAOZ hf. Hólamói) 

Best Live-Action Short Film

“Feeling Through” 

“The Letter Room” 

“The Present” 

“Two Distant Strangers” 

“White Eye” 

Best Cinematography

“Judas and the Black Messiah,” Sean Bobbitt 

“Mank,” Erik Messerschmidt 

“News of the World,” Dariusz Wolski 

“Nomadland,” Joshua James Richards 

“The Trial of the Chicago 7,” Phedon Papamichael 

PREDICTION: As I said the technical aspects in Nomadland will take the gold for sure and the cinematography was beautiful. She really captured the scenic landscapes across the country. I did think Judas and the Black Messiah had such a unique style and camera work was very strong.

Best Documentary Feature

“Collective”

“Crip Camp”

“The Mole Agent”

“My Octopus Teacher”

“Time”

Best Documentary Short Subject

“Colette”

“A Concerto Is a Conversation”

“Do Not Split”

“Hunger Ward”

“A Love Song for Latasha”

Best Film Editing

“The Father”

“Nomadland”

“Promising Young Woman”

“Sound of Metal”

“The Trial of the Chicago 7″

PREDICTION: Again, it is Nomadland’s to lose because of the technical aspects. However, when it comes to editing pieces of music or instrumental scenes, I feel like Sound of Metal would be the better choice. Also, we can’t cancel out The Father either because of the cycle of consciousness fading in and out for the protagonist.

Best International Feature Film

“Another Round” (Denmark) 

“Better Days” (Hong Kong)

“Collective” (Romania) 

“The Man Who Sold His Skin” (Tunisia)

“Quo Vadis, Aida?”(Bosnia and Herzegovina) 

PREDICTION: Another Round has been taking the season by storm and the director is also nominated so that is saying a lot. However, after watching Better Days and interviewing the director, Derek Tsang, the execution and honest storytelling should give it the edge.

Best Makeup and Hairstyling

“Emma”

“Hillbilly Elegy” 

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”

“Mank”

“Pinocchio”

PREDICTION: Viola Davis was completely transformed as Ma Rainey, so it’s only fitting that it would take this category. I can see Emma steal it here as it did have some good qualities about it.

Best Production Design

“The Father.” 

“Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom.”

“Mank.”

“News of the World.”

“Tenet.”

PREDICTION: The reason why The Father could win is because of how the production design changing paralleled the lead character’s descent into his illness. But, Ma Rainey’s design just felt rich in its colours and decoration with the only two rooms they had to work with. Again, do not count Mank out of the conversation.

If you haven’t voted yet, here is a prediction ballot link for the Oscars, thanks to The Academy. This is what it generated for me the other night. Yes, there are some changes but it’s still so difficult to choose.

Well there you have it! My full list of predictions. Let’s hope I get some right tonight. Let’s face it, even though we complain about the season, we always love to watch on Oscar Sunday.

‘The Father’ Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

The Father written and directed by Florian Zeller dives into the mind of an elderly man suffering with dementia. Anne (Olivia Colman) takes care of her father Anthony (Sir Anthony Hopkins) and begins to notice that he is slipping further away into this illness. She doesn’t know how to care for him properly, so she must find a way to make him as comfortable as possible and help him adapt to his surroundings. Zeller’s script would be interesting to read. After all, it is his play that he adapted to screen and I’m sure it is executed differently onstage. Even though the performances were absolutely brilliant, there was something that was lacking.

There were very strong moments between Coleman and Hopkins, very natural, emotional moments that candidly presented the illness. However, due to the execution of this script and the editing of the film, those moments got lost in the execution of the film. Of course, I can appreciate and understand what Zeller was attempting to do. He showed Anthony switch in-and-out of consciousness throughout the film but unfortunately, it hurt the narrative and the emotional connection to these characters. The film is more of a character piece than a clear narrative and that is completely fine but it doesn’t work as a film.

I truly would have loved to see this onstage because it would have had minimal production value and maybe even a smaller cast. It wouldn’t rely on the visual storytelling in regards to Anthony’s internalized mental struggle. The editing and the production design did work for the story Zeller was trying to tell and I commend him for trying something different. As we see Anthony fall into the depths of this illness, his surroundings begin to change; the flat that he lives in is slowly stripped away to reveal where he is actually living, in a care facility. It is a very interesting watch because of those elements, I just wish I could have connected to these characters a bit more.

The Father had incredible performances, especially from Sir Anthony Hopkins but the execution was flawed. The final scene of this film, where he attempted to explain what he was going through, was what should have been explored a bit more throughout. It felt like the conversations with his daughter Anne, took hold of his own emotional suffering and it would have been more effective to show that as well. That final scene brought me to tears and it is some of Hopkins’ best work as an actor. As someone who has seen what this illness can do firsthand, it did accurately show what happens to everyone involved in an interesting way and I respect what was done.