Dads Review


By: Amanda Guarragi 

Dads had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2019 and it is Bryce Dallas Howard’s directorial debut. The documentary covers a wide range of diverse families, across the globe, that show the true meaning, of what it takes to be a father. Howard opens the film with home footage of her being born and then has her father, Ron Howard, shared his views of fatherhood. It integrated celebrity fathers and true stories, from every perspective imaginable, some stories were fun and light, others were heartbreaking to sit through. At the end of the day, parenting does not come with a manual and Dads shows that in a very candid way.

It was such a lovely film because it has fathers at the forefront. We all know women can do it all and a mothers love is extremely important. When a father is present and involved in the child’s life, it is wonderful to see that dynamic of a father with his children. I am extremely close to my dad and I often find that films or tv shows, rarely have a positive father/daughter dynamic. There is always some conflict or the father is not in the picture at all. So films that have a positive and loving relationship representing that fatherly bond is a step in the right direction.

It is important to show, how fatherhood has changed and how men, in general, change their perspective of what it means to be a man. Celebrity dads such as, Ron Howard, Patton Oswalt, Will Smith, Neil Patrick Harris, Hasan Minaj, Jimmy Kimmel, Conan O’Brien, Jimmy Fallon, Ken Jeong, Kenan Thompson and Judd Apatow all had very insightful moments throughout the documentary. Howard had this steady flow when having the open discussions about fatherhood with each of them. It was candid because all of the anecdotes shared were realistic and grounded. You could feel Howard’s connection, to the men in her life and it was lovely.

Howard brought together different family units, that included diverse cultural representation, sexual orientation and economical backgrounds, in order to have viewers appreciate and understand what it means to be a father. The stories were truly special and to watch these fathers pull through, under their own health issues or financial issues was really moving. It had a very nice structure and it allowed the stories of Rance Howard, Reed Howard, Glen Henry, Robert Selby, Thiago Queiroz, Shuichi Sakuma, Rob Scheer and Reece Scheer to be the emotional centers of the documentary. The celebrity stories were used as the comedic relief, while these true stories shed light on so many different issues.

Dads is a documentary that shows the journey of the modern dad. There are plenty of heartfelt moments in this film and there is a perfect balance of humour, that counters the serious subject matter. Whether your child was adopted, or has gone through multiple surgeries, or has kept you up at night, causing you to be delusional, they have shaped you into the man you are today. Fathers are important and this documentary shows all the good dads, who have been there for their children. It is a really special film and a wonderful debut for Bryce Dallas Howard.

 

 

The King of Staten Island Review


By: Amanda Guarragi 

The King of Staten Island is Judd Apatow’s most personal film to date. He collaborated with Pete Davidson and Dave Sirus to bring Pete’s deeply emotional life to the screen. It was candid, realistic and raw to Pete’s journey. It was in typical Apatow fashion, to have such a natural flow to this story. They addressed mental illness and childhood trauma with humorous moments. In his mid -20s Scott (Pete Davidson) is at a standstill in his life, he dropped out of high school and his younger sister Claire (Maude Apatow) is heading out to college. As the events in his life unfold, Scott must come to terms with his father’s death and processes his grief in many ways.

For seventeen years Scott has lived without his father and the only memories he has of him, are the ones his mother, Margie (Marisa Tomei) shares with him over and over again. In Davidson’s life, his father was a firefighter for the FDNY. He was seen as a hero by many because of his bravery in saving someone’s life, as a building collapsed on top of him. Most of Davidson’s dark humour stems from his childhood trauma and his stand up is vulgar and borderline offensive. At the end of the day, that is what makes Pete, Pete. His humour may offend people but it is okay for him to make fun of his own trauma because it comes from such a personal place.

If you have been a fan of Judd Apatow’s since the beginning of his career, you know the way he makes his films. They are personal, witty and very well written. He always attempts to make real situations seem funny, even if it stems from a dark place. The reason why his films have so much heart and resonate with so many, is because he isn’t afraid to show his audience the reality of situations. He wants to say that these characters are real, concrete people, with a twisted sense of humour that exist in the real world.

To those who have followed Pete Davidson from his early stages on Saturday Night Live and appreciated his humour (even though sometimes he crossed the line), you will appreciate this film. I think everyone will learn something about Davidson through watching this film. You may dislike him a bit more, or even start to like him, it is all up to interpretation. This film highlights mental illness  and it’s through the eyes of Pete Davidson, who has truly suffered from it. To see the psychology of Scott, through the eyes of Davidson, is something raw and eye opening. It is a story that only Pete Davidson could tell and it is really special.

The film does drag on a little bit but the third act is really important to Scott’s arc. As his sister goes off to college, his mother begins dating again and Ray Bishop (Bill Burr) also works at the fire department. In the midst of all this, Scott is causing his own damage with his friends and when he finds out about his mother dating a fireman, he goes into a downward spiral and attempts to break them up. We find that Scott does not really know how to express his emotions and sometimes he lets it out through impulsive, violent behaviour, or everyone’s favourite mechanism, sarcasm.

After a huge blowout between Ray, Margie and Scott, they all go their separate ways. That’s why the third act is really special. It brings them all together in a very unexpected way. Scott begins to understand the life of a fireman and he experiences it firsthand. It was very cathartic for Davidson and the REAL stories shared of his father, were important, not only for Scott’s character arc in the film, but for Davidson to maybe get some closure. It was an emotional ending and Davidson gave a wonderful performance.

The King of Staten Island is not for everyone. The only way to appreciate this film, is if you are fans of both, Apatow and Davidson. To newcomers, they may not understand the sentimental value this holds for Davidson and why this was so important for him to make. It was also pretty funny, a lot of Davidson’s humour is things he would say under his breath and being able to catch what he says, in this film was great. It’s a long watch but it is definitely worth it to see the heart of Pete Davidson.

 

Return To Hardwick Review


By: Amanda Guarragi 

Return To Hardwick is a generic World War 2 documentary that highlights the 93rd bomb group. Director Michael Sellers brings together sons, daughters and other family members to share their memories of their loved ones who served in the war. Michael Cudlitz (Band of Brothers, The Walking Dead) narrates this journey as the younger generation attempts to travel to the Southern part of England, to uncover the history of a disappearing World War 2 air base.

It was a very nice three part structure that was beautifully shot. They chose to use still photos, archive footage and reconstructed set pieces to tell the story. It is emotional at times because the children/grandchildren of this soldiers, were talking about their experiences in the war and their own relationships with them. What they did really well was integrating the archive footage, with present day, as the younger generation made their way to the air base.

This film offers viewers an in depth look into the lives of those who fought in World War 2 bombing crews. This documentary felt so wholesome and genuine, in the way it was presented because the heart of the director, was with his own grandfather who fought in the war. Those connections are stronger than people think and it came from such a pure, honest place when delivering this story.

The one thing that also worked quite well, was seeing the veterans retell the horrors they experienced in the war. It was really nice to hear their version of the story, while Sellers chose to recreate certain moments from World War 2 in very unique ways, in order to enhance the stories that were being told. It felt like a whole other life time, when watching this film because we have never experienced war the way that generation did.

Return To Hardwick is an emotional World War 2 documentary, that hits all the right notes and leaves you with a better understanding of the hardships soldiers faced during that period. The film is like a heartfelt love letter to that generation serving in the 93rd bomb group, it pulls at your heartstrings and takes you on the journey with the children and grandchildren of those soldiers who served their country.