Liebster Award Nomination

This morning I woke up to find out, that I was nominated by Film: Uncharted EIF for a Liebster Award. I am truly grateful for the time you have taken to read my reviews and am honoured by the nomination!

Without further ado, the official rules of the competition are as follows:

  1. Thank the nominator in your award post.
  2. Place the award logo somewhere on your blog.
  3. You must state up to 11 facts about yourself.
  4. Complete the questions that your nominator provided.
  5. Nominate as many bloggers as you’d like (11 is the maximum).
  6. Ask your nominees a series of questions (11 is the maximum).

Facts

  1. I consider myself a full Italian, even though I was born and raised in Canada. 
  2. I was a musical theatre junkie growing up and I even starred in stage plays.
  3. I went to a Regional Arts Program in high school for Theatre. 
  4. I have been to Las Vegas and New York over 4 times now.
  5. I am an only child. 
  6. I am an arachnophobe.
  7. The Aviator (2004) was the very first film that made me fall in love with everything that goes into making a film.
  8. I have attended TIFF for the past seven years and each year is better than the last. 
  9. My favourite dish to make is Risotto, love mixing it up a bit.
  10. I fractured my nose when I was 4 and now it’s crooked but you can’t really tell, only I can, which is somehow worse.
  11. Michael Jackson’s Thriller music video still haunts me until this day.

Questions:

1. If you could have dinner with anyone from history, who would it be?

I would love to have dinner with Marilyn Monroe and Charlie Chaplin because they represent two, very different eras, in the industry and I would love to find out how they coped with the politics during their given period.

2. What would be on the gag reel of your life?

I have fallen way too many times. I think falling of a skateboard or a bike would most definitely be on there. I also think falling from the top bunk bed while playing hide and seek would also be on there for a gag reel.

3. Which fictional character would be the most boring to meet in real life?

I think Harry Potter would be boring in real life. I mean, without all the Voldermort drama, he really is just a dude who does magic and he can’t do magic in front of muggles (assuming I am one), so really, is he all that he’s cracked up to be?

4. If you could read minds, whose would you want to read?

I would love to read Martin Scorsese’s mind. He’s a walking encyclopedia of film knowledge and I think it would be fun to hear his actual thoughts while watching other movies.

5. What problem or situation did TV / movies make you think would be common, but when you grew up you found out it wasn’t?

I think house parties were the biggest myth, I was so disappointed when I got to high school, to find out that it’s mainly just sitting around and talking. It’s actually more awkward than anything they painted it out to be.

6. Do you judge a book by its cover?

I think everyone does at first but then they do attempt to get to know others and that’s what changes their perception of them. Rumours and gossip also tends to ruin the perception as well. I personally don’t, I like to look at things on my own terms and try to assess things from the inside out.

7. What wastes the most time in your day to day life?

Twitter, I’m looking at you.

8. What’s the one food you could never bring yourself to eat?

I have stayed away from horseradish my whole life because I hate the smell.

9. If your life as a movie, what songs would be on the soundtrack?

Vanessa Carlton – A Thousand Miles
Thunderstruck – AC/DC
Independent Women Part. 1 – Destiny’s Child
Love Shack – The B-52s
Giulia – DJ Lhasa
Gloria – Laura Branigan
Pour Some Sugar On Me – Def Leppard

10. What terrible movie do you love?

Since Adam Sandler is universally hated for some reason, I’m going to go with Billy Madison (1995), that movie is a classic and I love it so much.

11. If you had to live in a different country, what would it be?

Italia, always.

Nominees:

  1. Eddie Harrison – Film Authority 
  2. Jordan and Eddie – The Movie Guys
  3. Leo – Geekly Goods
  4. Shawn and Todd – Movies Matrix 

Questions: 

  1. Name one film that you would watch on repeat for the rest of your life?
  2. What are your Top 3 Best Picture Winners
  3. Name one film that is critically acclaimed but you just didn’t get the hype?
  4. What was your favourite childhood film?
  5. What is your favourite movie theatre snack?
  6. How many films have you watched in a single day?
  7. What is the one place that you’ve always wanted to travel to?
  8. What are the Top 5 films you would recommend to someone?
  9. What is your go to comfort film?
  10. If you could be in any comedy film, which one would you be in and why?
  11. If you watch one director’s filmography for the rest of your life, whose would you choose?

 

Have fun!

HOT DOCS 2020: LOVE & STUFF


By: Amanda Guarragi 

“The only good thing about time running out, is that it pushes people to find the strength to show up.” 

Love & Stuff is a deeply personal documentary on motherhood and the cycle of life. Peabody Award winning filmmaker Judith Helfand, documented her terminally ill mother’s final moments, at home-hospice before she passed. The camera, helped Helfand stay connected to her mother during hard times and it was used as another form of communication. In this feature, Helfand continues the story that she began two decades ago, with Healthy Baby Girl (Sundance, Peabody 1997) through these films, Helfand adds emotional layers, by openly discussing her own traumas, addressing grief by using dark humour and reflecting on the power of family.

This feature is incredibly emotional because of the raw, human connection the viewer has with Helfand, as she goes on this journey with her mother. Helfand has normal, everyday conversations with her and integrates old home footage to show the drastic change in her mother. Her mother, like every mother, wanted what was best for her daughter and it was revealed that Judith could not bear any children of her own. So the connectivity to motherhood, was the strongest part of this feature because at a time where Judith needed her mother, to guide her through the adoption process and in raising her daughter, she had passed away.

“How do you live without your mother?” it’s a question – through our own paranoia of the endless possibilities that could happen to our mother’s – that we ask ourselves daily. How can any part of my life be possible without the woman that gave me life? How can I grow as an adult without her guiding me? It doesn’t matter what age you are, life is always hard to navigate and everyone confides in their mother or motherly figure. In Judith’s case, her baby girl Theo, was born right after her mother passed and many said it was a gift from her. How does one learn about motherhood, if they’ve never been a mother before? No one is ever prepared to look after a child and to have an entire being, be so dependent on you, it is definitely a challenge in itself.

As Judith’s mother was getting to her final months, she had become her baby to practice on, before she was able to complete the adoption. It was a humorous moment, but no one fully understands how heartbreaking it is to watch a person, who you have known your whole life to be physically strong, to lose that very part of themselves until they are in that situation themselves. I have gone through those stages with my grandparents, I have looked after them and I have struggled with understanding the aging process. How? How can we go from such strong, independent beings, to being children again? This is why my heart is always with the senior community, they have lived such full lives and then to see them in such a fragile state is hard.

I also find it quite interesting that seniors are always more open and candid discussing death, almost as if they start preparing us past a certain age. They make plenty of jokes centering around death, once they hit the age of seventy five and in a way, it’s good that they do that. What parents do their whole lives, is try to set up their children for a strong, healthy life and we don’t realize that is what they’re doing, until we have achieved our goals.

The one thing that really stood out to me in this feature, is that Judith went through all of her mother’s belongings with her and then kept everything in boxes after her passing. The emotional attachment to objects is very hard to break because of all the memories that are tied to them. I thought the individual shots of the objects Judith decided to highlight, were very important because whether it was a piano or a tube of lipstick, it reminded Judith of her mother. Instead of a memory locked in your mind, there is a physical, concrete object that you can hold in your hands, which will still have traces of your loved one.

Love & Stuff is a beautiful documentary about life and death. It shows the value of family and the power of motherhood. It handles grief with such tenderness and shows a side of seniors, that many do not see before their passing. Somehow, it is more difficult to grieve your loved one, while they are alive because you know you have to let them go eventually. It is important to remember that even if your mother is no longer with you, she taught you everything you needed to know to survive this life and as time goes on, you will incorporate what she taught you and add your own anecdotes.