‘Without Remorse’ Review

By: Amanda Guarragi

Tom Clancy’s Without Remorse is about a Navy Seal, named John Clark (Michael B. Jordan), who goes on a path to avenge his wife’s murder only to find himself inside of a larger conspiracy. You have Michael B. Jordan leading an interesting cast that doesn’t really work for some strange reason. The film has an interesting story but the execution was lacklustre. It was difficult to follow at times and the pacing of the film is not engaging enough for the viewer to sit through the runtime. There are strong action scenes but they do not make up the way the story plays out.

It is always difficult to adapt novels to screen and unfortunately Without Remorse suffered from trying to incorporate too much. The writing for John Clark just wasn’t strong enough and it pains me to say this because Michael B. Jordan is one of my favourite actors working today. For some strange reason it just didn’t work for me. His military life and domestic life were rushed in the beginning, only for the aftermath of his wife’s death to last longer than it should have. It’s Tom Clancy, it really shouldn’t have been this hard to take this action-packed story and translate it to screen.

It just does not hold the viewer’s attention long enough to make them care about the actual story or the characters. It felt like even the characters were waiting for the action scenes to happen, in order for anything to move forward. The story just didn’t flow and the writing for the characters seemed really bland. The real downfall of the film was that majority of the action scenes – which we all patiently waited for – were all in complete darkness, it was impossible to see what was happening or even who was fighting who.

Without Remorse had potential to be a great action piece for Michael B. Jordan but unfortunately it fell flat. It was hard to sit through because the writing just wasn’t engaging enough. The story was overstuffed, as they tried incorporate as much as they could from the novel. It really suffered the adaptation issues that many films face. I could see the story they were trying to tell but there wasn’t enough explanation or connection to any of these characters for any viewer to care. It is definitely not enough that Jordan was leading this film.

‘Things Heard And Seen’ Review

By: Amanda Guarragi

Things Heard And Seen is a really interesting ghost story, centered around a couple, George (James Norton) and Catherine Claire (Amanda Seyfried) who end up moving to a small town because of George’s new job. Catherine stays at home with her daughter Franny, as her husband goes off to work. There are issues that are shown between the couple early on in the film, which makes for a very dramatic watch as the film goes on. We notice that the connection Catherine has to the house and the spirit within it is more than just your typical ghost story.

The first half of this film will definitely get you invested in this couple. We see that Catherine is struggling with an eating disorder and she feels like she is trapped in this life that she is in. Catherine feels like she doesn’t belong for some reason and George just continues to move forward without her, not caring about her at all. We see this in the move to a small town because he got a job offer, or did he? The mystery truly lies with George because of James Norton’s great performance. It is very layered and as the film goes on, we see a different side of him. We find out who he truly is before Catherine does.

What I really enjoyed about the first half of this film, was the exploration of the afterlife and of certain spirits merging with the living. There can be good spirits that latch onto good people and evil spirits that latch onto bad energy. Instead of just focusing on the evil spirits in the house, the focus is on a female spirit who lived her life in fear because of her husband. The spirit latches onto Catherine because she is going through her own nightmare with her husband. George was dishonest from the beginning and the marital issues get pushed to the forefront in the second half of this film.

It had a unique story, interesting framing and great performances but as they wrapped up this ghost story, it felt incredibly rushed. It didn’t feel like a rewarding ending, even though the symbolism at the end with the paintings, made it very clear who the spirits latched onto. It had a strong first half but lost its way in the second. If you enjoy supernatural thrillers, then it is still an enjoyable watch. The drama between husband and wife will keep you engaged until the very end, Seyfried is fantastic in this!

Hot Docs 2021: ‘It Is Not Over Yet’ Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

It Is Not Over Yet is an in-depth, emotional journey into the day-to-day rhythm of a controversial nursing home for people with dementia in Denmark. There are many stories that come out of nursing homes that aren’t always positive. There have been very traumatic stories surrounding the treatment of the elderly, especially those suffering from dementia. The documentary highlights, the founding nurse of Dagmarsminde, May Bjerre Eiby, who has no interest in specific dementia diagnoses or medicine. Since neither improves the quality of life for her 11 residents.

As someone who has seen dementia first-hand, this documentary made me extremely emotional. To just see a different approach for treating this illness was moving. My own grandmother went through so much in the nursing home and it is truly heartbreaking to leave a loved one in there. It is a tough pill to swallow because of the negativity surrounding the nurses who work in those facilities. Recently, it has been uncovered that the long-term care homes in my local area have been violent with patients, or they even just let them go without assisting them. They have never had full time care, or even proper care, for that matter.

What nurse Eiby enforces to her residents, is a treatment inspired by methods introduced by Florence Nightingale 150 years ago, as well as Danish philosopher Løgstrup. It is called ‘Compassion Treatment’, as Eiby calls it. It prioritizes hugs, touch, humour, nature, and the joy of being a part of a community. It was just such a refreshing take on the approach in helping elderly people suffering from dementia. After suffering the painful loss of her own father, due to neglect at a nursing home, Eiby is determined to inspire complete change in the way people with dementia are treated in the healthcare system.

It Is Not Over Yet is a very intimate, beautiful and informative documentary on how to approach helping those suffering from dementia. It is a necessary watch that can hopefully bring some change in order for the residents and their family members to feel safe leaving their loved ones in a nursing home. Eiby’s approach is something that should be studied and adapted in order for people to understand what dementia is and how it can be treated without medicine or any form of frustration towards the elderly during their time of need.


Hot Docs 2021: ‘Lady Buds’ Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

Feature documentary, ‘Lady Buds’ follows the widely praised 2016 decision to legalize cannabis in California. And because women are so amazing, there are six women who emerge from the shadows to enter this new commercial industry. These women become farmers and entrepreneurs as they navigate the new legislation put in place. The women who have shaped the foundations of this industry for decades, find themselves struggling for a piece of this industry in a market that they helped create. The documentary does address many issues in regards to the cannabis industry. Highlighting advocates for the war on drugs and the racial injustice that marginalized communities still face today.

Lady Buds features second-generation cannabis farmer Chiah Rodriques, 72-year old African-American retired Catholic school principal turned dispensary owner Sue Taylor, Latinx queer activist Felicia Carbajal, serial entrepreneur Karyn Wagner, and Humboldt elders ‘The Bud Sisters’. We see every single perspective on the cannabis industry and how each business owner faced hardships in this field. It was such an interesting watch because there was a great balance of light and funny moments, while still addressing serious issues.

It had a 70s vibe, as the women give a brief history of the journey they have gone on with cannabis. Each story speaks to the many opportunities and issues facing commercial cannabis today. It is very educational and there are clear explanations of the use of medical marijuana for elders. There is an entire process and fight that goes into this industry. Director Chris J. Russo really dives into the lives of these women who are the backbone of the cannabis community in California. The documentary shows an appreciation of those who broke barriers while still moving the fight forward.

Lady Buds takes the viewer on a journey through the cannabis industry and it explores different perspectives. The fact that there are women from different backgrounds who have had different experiences is inspiring. There is so much to uncover about this subject and Russo did a beautiful job in having their stories heard. The documentary is all about community and what it can do for you. There are important moments that really highlight the meaning of being there for one another. This community gives people a sense of comfort and understanding.

‘The Father’ Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

The Father written and directed by Florian Zeller dives into the mind of an elderly man suffering with dementia. Anne (Olivia Colman) takes care of her father Anthony (Sir Anthony Hopkins) and begins to notice that he is slipping further away into this illness. She doesn’t know how to care for him properly, so she must find a way to make him as comfortable as possible and help him adapt to his surroundings. Zeller’s script would be interesting to read. After all, it is his play that he adapted to screen and I’m sure it is executed differently onstage. Even though the performances were absolutely brilliant, there was something that was lacking.

There were very strong moments between Coleman and Hopkins, very natural, emotional moments that candidly presented the illness. However, due to the execution of this script and the editing of the film, those moments got lost in the execution of the film. Of course, I can appreciate and understand what Zeller was attempting to do. He showed Anthony switch in-and-out of consciousness throughout the film but unfortunately, it hurt the narrative and the emotional connection to these characters. The film is more of a character piece than a clear narrative and that is completely fine but it doesn’t work as a film.

I truly would have loved to see this onstage because it would have had minimal production value and maybe even a smaller cast. It wouldn’t rely on the visual storytelling in regards to Anthony’s internalized mental struggle. The editing and the production design did work for the story Zeller was trying to tell and I commend him for trying something different. As we see Anthony fall into the depths of this illness, his surroundings begin to change; the flat that he lives in is slowly stripped away to reveal where he is actually living, in a care facility. It is a very interesting watch because of those elements, I just wish I could have connected to these characters a bit more.

The Father had incredible performances, especially from Sir Anthony Hopkins but the execution was flawed. The final scene of this film, where he attempted to explain what he was going through, was what should have been explored a bit more throughout. It felt like the conversations with his daughter Anne, took hold of his own emotional suffering and it would have been more effective to show that as well. That final scene brought me to tears and it is some of Hopkins’ best work as an actor. As someone who has seen what this illness can do firsthand, it did accurately show what happens to everyone involved in an interesting way and I respect what was done.