To All The Boys: Always And Forever Interview With Trezzo Mahoro


By: Amanda Guarragi

We all seem have our own traits that we want in a best friend. Majority of us want someone who is the opposite of who we are so they can ground us. As we’ve seen Lara Jean (Lana Condor) evolve over the years, we know that she is very reserved and lives in her own romantic little world. Her best friend Lucas (Trezzo Mahoro) is the total opposite of Lara Jean but that’s why their friendship works so well. Lucas is always the one to add some fun to her life, even if things aren’t going so well for her. In the To All the Boys trilogy, Lucas acts as the universal friend for everyone watching. The one we can relate to and the one who reminds us of our best friends.

We see Lucas grow with Lara Jean and I think that is why we love seeing their friendship. He is someone who just pops up when you need him most. Trezzo Mahoro loves Lucas, as much as we all do and after playing him for a while now, he feels even more connected to him,

His sense of fashion, he’s great but besides that he’s just, he’s a great friend. He’s a friend that I think we all need right now. Especially in this pandemonium we’re in. He would be a very cool person to have and he’s diverse and I love him. I love playing him because I could be his friend. 

Courtesy of Netflix Film

The reason why this trilogy is so wonderful is because it brings back the teenage rom-com in all its glory. There are many romantic comedies that people secretly love and call it a ‘guilty pleasure’, when it shouldn’t be considered one. We can enjoy all genres for what they are. For example, my favourite romantic comedy is When Harry Met Sally. Yes, it’s a bit dated, but for me it’s THE blueprint for all rom-coms. When asked about his favourite romantic comedy, Mahoro answered with 50 First Dates. He agreed that Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore have great chemistry, much like Noah Centineo and Lana Condor. Sometimes people just click on screen.

This third instalment makes you feel like you are back in high school because of the senior trip, college applications and the most important event, prom. Mahoro does think that everyone can relate to this trilogy because we have all been through the similar situations as Lara Jean or, even Kavinsky in our early days,

I’m sure we can all think of that one crush that we had back in grade six to eight or whatever grade we were in. So, 100% I related to all of the material in there BUT at the same time it was kind of hilarious because when I did take myself back there, I was like oh geez, I can’t believe that is what I was doing at that time. So Lara Jean definitely did it better than I did. 

Courtesy of Netflix Film

Even though we all suffer from secondhand embarrassment, I’m sure we all enjoyed feeling all of those emotions again through these characters. We can all learn from these characters and that is the most important thing, these teenage romantic comedies can give us. We can’t learn about life experiences through a textbook in school, we need to be grateful that movies can give us these lessons, no matter how old we are. Mahoro also learned a lot from this trilogy,

This trilogy taught me how to be more patient, that’s for sure. The same way that Peter and Lara are with each other. They definitely taught me that and also to just have fun and have a good time. That is very, very important. I feel like people have forgotten how to do that now. That is an important aspect in our lives right now. 

Patience is always the key and can be applied to how you handle everything in your life. Mahoro also goes on to say that Lara Jean and Kavinsky’s relationship can help everyone take chances. To not be be afraid in taking the first step. That if you want something, to just go for it and put your all into it. It doesn’t necessarily have to be about relationships but this is what the trilogy has given everyone. It spreads love and gives us all hope that romance isn’t dead, that people will love you for who you are and that any relationship can be a great love story.

Ammonite Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

Ammonite is a romantic love story, loosely inspired by the life of British paleontologist Mary Anning (Kate Winslet). Mary owns her own shop, where she sells fossils to rich tourists. Mary first meets her potential love interest, when a tourist and his wife, Charlotte Murchison (Saoirse Ronan) stumble upon a piece of ammonite in her shop. Francis Lee was able to capture the subtleties and beauty of a budding romance but something was missing.

The film is slow and patient. Patient in uncovering the details in the fossils. Patient in processing Mary’s interest in women. Patient in soft touches and stolen glances. All of that was done properly in order to build tension, to anticipate the moment Mary and Charlotte melt into each other, but the film as a whole is dull. Even though Winslet and Ronan gave nuanced performances, it seemed to be their weakest entry in their filmographies.

photograph by Agatha A. Nitecka/RÅN studio
(left) Saiorse Ronan and Kate Winslet

The only time you would feel their love for each other was when they were sexually engaged. Yes, there was plenty of yearning and smiles exchanged with each other, but the chemistry was lacking in that department. It is also very evident, that a man is behind the camera, when filming those intimate, sex scenes and it felt awkward to watch. There was no passion, no love, no lust, all of that was lost in the act of it.

Ammonite is another entry in the sad lesbian romance category, that we seem to have generated over the years. The film had great potential to be something more than it was because of the starpower but it didn’t quite get there. Francis Lee wrote a very simple story that brought these two women together, to experience something beautiful and then it just exits your mind, the second you finish the film.

Emma (2020) Review


By: Amanda Guarragi 

“Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.” – Jane Austen 

The first line in the novel is also presented at the beginning of the film adaptation of Emma, which was adapted to screen by Eleanor Catton and directed by Autumn de Wilde. Having this quote placed at the beginning of the film, set the tone for the film de Wilde was about to give her audience. The film felt like the embodiment of the character of Emma Woodhouse, like her entire soul was spread into the corners of the frame and we could feel her presence, even if she wasn’t on screen. De Wilde captured Ms. Woodhouse’s entire being and made sure we understood who she was.

Emma Woodhouse is one of my favourite characters in literature and Anya Taylor Joy owned the role. She was just as clever, beautiful, witty and had a knack in playing matchmaker for those around her. The one thing that de Wilde and Catton really did well was introducing the web of characters that Ms. Austen so expertly crafted when telling Emma’s story. There was such a flow between scenes and the tension between characters was very strong. This is probably one of the most perfect films of 2020, everything worked so well together, from the production design to the costuming and the score was perfectly composed to personify Emma herself.

Now I am not a hopeless romantic and I think that’s why I love Emma Woodhouse so much. She just wants to play matchmaker to make others happy and she always wants the best for those around her. It’s hard navigating your own romantic journey and sometimes you’ll find love when you least expect it but for Emma, it just never happened the way she wanted it to or who she wanted it with. Maybe expectations do put a damper on your romantic journey, or who you think you deserve to be with. At the same time those standards or values you carry should never be seen as an issue in hindering a relationship.

The film also made me reminisce about my own relationships with people and how I’ve played a role in each of their lives. It’s hard to process the role you play in someone’s life because you’re just focused on how you present yourself to them. Emma made me look at all those relationships a bit closer and asses the way I was treated, to eventually come to the conclusion, that I was used majority of the time for personal gain. I’ve been acting as a placeholder my entire life. Just once, I was blessed enough to actually feel like I meant something to someone, I didn’t feel like they were using me to make themselves feel better about who they were. It’s hard to come to these conclusions, and by watching Emma, it felt like an emotional support film of feeling understood and seen.

Emma had the perfect balance of tension between possible suitors and a whirlwind of situations that caused Emma to spin out of control. Emma’s chemistry with Mr. Knightley (Johnny Flynn) was felt from the first time they were on screen together. I’m someone who picks up the subtleties and I definitely appreciate a slow burn. Whenever they were bickering together or near each other, their hidden feelings for each other were felt and I loved how de Wilde chose to unravel their story. Flynn and Taylor Joy complimented each other so well and I think they may be one of my favourite onscreen pairings to date.

Emma is one of the most delightful films of 2020 and if you’re a fan of Victorian Era romance films and love Jane Austen then this will definitely be right up your alley. It’s beautifully shot and adapted so well that Autumn de Wilde will make you fall in love with Austen’s world all over again.

 

The Photograph Movie Review

BY: AMANDA GUARRAGI 

The Photograph is a beautiful film that was written and directed by Stella Meghie. Her direction and vision for this story was executed so fluidly, that both love stories, blended together quite nicely.

I don’t know where to place the film based on my emotions throughout. I was definitely happy to see two black characters, falling in love, in the most natural way possible. I appreciated the way Christina Eames’ letter came into play and the editing allowed for the third act to make a solid impact. Not only is this a film about feeling an unexplainable connection to someone, it also explains the logic behind certain decisions, involving love. Sometimes people make mistakes and use logic when necessary and sometimes love trumps logic and things work out.

After the death of Christina Eames, her daughter Mae, finds a letter addressed to her and as she begins reading it, she understands that her mother, was a woman first and a mother second. Meghie wrote a screenplay that shows the complexities of being a woman and her womanhood is questioned by her daughter Mae, while she reads her letter. Meghie, writes Christina Eames, as this ambitious photographer, who puts her career before anything else because that’s what she truly loves. She also had a beautiful connection, to her first love Isaac, their love was pure. Their love story was put to the test because of Eames’ need to move to New York, in order to pursue her career.

On the other hand, Mae, who is played by the lovely Issa Rae, not only questions her mother and the way she raised her but how she views herself. Mae believes that she has her mother’s tendencies, to just walk away from a situation but as her story goes on and she reads her mother’s words, she understands the grey area of love and logic. Issa Rae and LaKeith Stanfield, who plays a journalist, named Michael Block, had wonderful chemistry and without that this film wouldn’t have been the same. They both elevated their love story, while still trying to understand Christina’s love story with Isaac.

As someone who is very logical when making decisions, I understood many of the choices the character’s made while watching this. Trying to use your head, while your heart is beating loudly is one of the hardest things anyone has to do. It’s also the reason why many people stay in a relationship that simply won’t work. There are many factors to weigh and if you overthink (like me) and think of many scenarios, logic trumps love, majority of the time. In the case of a romantic drama, it’s obviously the opposite, so it was nice to see that level of optimism.

The Photograph is a great love story and will break your heart at times. Christina Eames and Isaac’s love story is one for the ages and it will leave you heartbroken. As for Mae and Michael, they wanted their love story to go in a different direction, even if there were some challenges. It’s a lovely romantic drama and I’m very happy that film with this kind of message exists.