Dummy Short Film Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

Dummy follows a detained suspect, as he walks investigators through the scene of his loathsome crimes. Surprisingly, his law-enforcement escort makes an unnerving display of fellowship. On the surface, the film is beautifully shot and writer-director Laurynas Bareisa makes some great choices while navigating through the forest. It’s also a very interesting perspective if you really think about it. Not many filmmakers show this side of a crime scene, especially with the detained suspect. So to write a film from this perspective was definitely unique.

The issue with Dummy is that the one woman working with the team, Miglé is the only one taking notes and actually detaching herself from the story. The rest of the men listening to the detained suspect are hanging on his every word and getting to know him as a person. As if his actions of rape and murder of a woman is a minor flaw. Miglé keeps her distance and the men are constantly jabbing with poor jokes. It was hard to sit there and hear them joke around, when the rapist is just casually explaining what he did to the woman.

When they finally got to the end of the crime scene, the detained subject wanted to go for a swim and the rest of the men allowed him to. Miglé stayed on land, while the rest of the men joined him in the water. This showed that it was a boys club and that the treatment of women wasn’t important enough to hold this man accountable for his actions. It was just really jarring and unsettling. In such a short amount of time, the group dynamic is established and the treatment of Miglé is horrible. There was one moment where the rapist reenacts what he did with the dummy that was used through this journey. The men around him made jokes involving Miglé and it was incredibly disturbing.

At first, Dummy just seems like a regular investigation but as the story goes on, it becomes so much more than that. The writing from Laurynas Bareisa is incredibly strong because he doesn’t pack the dialogue. He plants certain remarks and keywords to make you realize that these men are actually horrible. The story progresses slowly but it definitely leaves you with so much to unpack. It is an entirely different perspective on how to write story showing the treatment of women.

Cayenne Short Film Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

As a woman, there is always reason to be on high alert. Women have been conditioned to be aware of their surroundings and protect themselves from predators. Women are the ones who carry mace in their back pocket and always have to be five steps ahead in order to be safe. What Simon Gionet does in Cayenne is interesting because he creates tension in the most basic form. The atmosphere at a secluded gas station, late at night, set the tone for the female clerk quite well. The second a man approaches her, you get an odd feeling in the pit of your stomach.

It is a very simple story but the way it was structured and presented made Cayenne intriguing. The female clerk goes out to help fix this man’s car. As she helps him, the man makes small talk with her and she is very short with him. There are subtle glances and reactions from the man, that make you question his intentions. Thus making the viewer feel like something bad is about to happen. Gionet did a very good job in creating tension in this case and making the viewer feel uncomfortable. All I wanted was to get the female clerk back to safety because this guy felt creepy.

What impressed me the most was the tracking shot near the end of the piece. Gionet follows the female clerk with his camera from behind, as she walks back to the store. The back of her head is placed in the lower half of the frame, almost like the person walking behind her was slightly taller. The assumption was made that the man was following her back to the store and in that moment your anxiety spikes. Gionet places you in the shoes of the female clerk so well and the tension is felt. The ending of the film is not what you expect at all, so it definitely keeps you invested.

Cayenne is a very well-written and directed short film that heightens your awareness of how women live in constant paranoia. Gionet shows the most simple interaction, that could happen on a regular day and the energy shifts because it’s through the eyes of a woman. It is the female clerk’s experience and yet, it symbolizes what all women think about. How they have to prepare themselves to outwit a man and get out of a possible situation. Women go through this more than we care to admit, it’s the everyday anxiety when a man looks at you in a different way.

Stormchaser Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

Have you thought about chasing tornadoes?

Have you ever gone on a spontaneous adventure and it turned out to be the most thrilling moment of your life?

Well Bonnie Blue (Mary Birdsong) went storm chasing with her father when she was a teenager and she fell in love with every single aspect. The wind going full speed, the way the tornado formed and the colours around the shape. Most importantly sharing that with the one man in her life that she could depend on. Bonnie loved her dad and all of those adventures with him were truly something special. Fast forward many years later, where Bonnie inherited her dad’s old pickup truck and is now working as a salesman, for shingles. After all those years storm chasing, Bonnie knew about those shingles blowing off.

Courtesy of Culture Catalyst

Bonnie was the lone wolf on her team, meaning she was the only woman on the salesman team and it looked exhausting. The workplace at ‘Flip’s’ was beyond toxic and filled with testosterone. When Bonnie walked into work, you could feel the sense of entitlement from majority of the men working there because they were salesmen. Bonnie did not hold back at all with her reactions, every single time Flip (Stephen Plunkett) said something Bonnie just looked disgusted. It showed how toxic a workplace can be and how sexist men can be. At first Bonnie wanted to make some sales for Flip but then when she realized he was playing her, things took a turn for the worst.

The ending of this film had karma written all over it and I loved that it came from the eye of the storm, which was inside Bonnie the whole time. Bonnie’s relationship with her father was incredibly strong, almost like a force of nature bonding them together and that’s how Bonnie transforms at the end of this film. It has such dry humour that the comedic moments were delivered flawlessly and had me laughing. Director Gretl Claggett made a really fun film with a deeper meaning.

How Adult Themes Can Be Elevated Through Stop Motion Animation: An Interview With Josephine Lohoar Self


By: Amanda Guarragi

There are many ways filmmakers have incorporated themes of grief, love and loss in their films. In The Fabric of You, writer and director Josephine Lohoar Self uses stop motion animation, to create emotional connections through memories. The film is set in the Bronx, where we are introduced to Michael, a gay, twenty-year-old mouse, who hides his true identity, while he works as a tailor. When Isaac enters the shop one day, he changes Michael’s perspective and their relationship blossoms. The film is presented by the Scottish Film Talent Network and funded by the BFI and Creative Scotland. The film had its world premier at The 2019 Edinburgh Film Festival as part of The New British Animation 2 Strand.

The concept of the film was inspired by the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus by American cartoonist Art Spiegleman. The novel recounts the experiences of the author’s father, during the Holocaust with drawn wide-eyed mice, representing Jewish people and menacing cats as Nazis. It spoke to Lohoar Self, “I used it as a catalyst for looking at stop motion animation as a way of telling more adult themes and seeing it as a vehicle for themes of grief and memory.” this is what the film does so well. The memories that Michael reminisces about throughout his day cut into his everyday activities. They can be happy memories or traumatic ones and it is all framed in how he processes those moments.

Michael

Lohoar Self has a Fine Arts background and wanted to incorporate her artistic knowledge as a painter through animation. She is skilled in telling stories through her paintings and wanted to combine that with her love for filmmaking,

“I enjoy working with like-minded creative people, so painting for me was sort of isolating. This was a great collaborative, creative experience with film and animation. That’s what it offers and I was particularly drawn to stop motion animation because of that.”

She felt that stop motion animation could explore different levels because of the endless possibilities that can be created in that space. There are moments that can be altered through memories in time and space, “I think I was really interested in exploring how grief affects memory and how memories are affected after someone passes on.” Lohoar Self said. There are moments in The Fabric of You that cut through Michael’s everyday activities to show that he misses his partner. Those were powerful moments because anyone who has suffered a loss will understand how Michael is feeling.

Michael and Isaac

There are waves of sadness that can hit you at the most random moments because a small thing could remind you have that person and that is what this film does so well. Lohoar Self wanted to present the complexities of those feelings through different plains, “I thought it would be fun to draw the parallels between people seeing objects and memory and also cutting between three different layers of reality, imaginary and fantasy.” She also used a singular object, a button, to create a profound moment between Michael and Isaac.

Lohoar Self wanted to create a deeper, emotional connection between Isaac and Michael by using the buttons as a representation of individuality. Fashion is something that can define you as a person, Lohoar Self goes onto say, “Fashion can be a form of expression, so I think for me, fashion as a concept in the film was quite important, as a way of revealing your identity and revealing who you are but also a way of hiding it and concealing it.” Isaac accepted Michael for who he was and the button symbolizes something entirely different halfway through the film. The importance of that particular object being tied to a memory is what makes this film emotional.

The Fabric of You uses stop motion animation to explore themes of love and grief through different plains. The narrative structure allows the audience to process the important memories as Michael does, his emotional spectrum is put on display and affects his everyday life. The film is assembled to draw in the viewer with its quick editing and fantastical elements, while retelling a traumatic story that can resonate with everyone. There is so much that can be done with animation and to be able to use a different form, to express adult themes, can really help audiences process their feelings.

Cake Day: A Story About Recovery With Filmmakers Phillip Thomas and Cameron Crosby


By: Amanda Guarragi

Cake Day is a short film that authentically highlights the journey of an addict. Cameron (Cameron Crosby) emotionally deteriorates, as he contemplates the consequences of honesty, on a day of celebration during one of his meetings. It is a poignant film that is directed with such care and honesty from everyone involved. It is important to handle this subject matter with the utmost respect, when generally retelling an experience that you may, or may not have been directly affected by. The centerpiece of this film is the meeting itself and that is why it is so special.

Director Phillip Thomas really wanted to present an emotional story that would speak to everyone. He wanted to be able to create a sense of empathy and understanding for those who have been struggling with an addiction. He managed to create a community within the film itself. It was comforting to watch this short film, knowing that the people behind the camera wanted to create this support system for its viewers,

You can’t tell an experience like this without having the authenticity and people around you to teach you what it is or else you’re going to fail. That was the whole point of the process of doing this short film, it was to make sure that I could in fact speak on behalf of people, that I haven’t experienced what they’ve experienced.”

– Phillip Thomas, Director of Cake Day

Thomas did his research and he went to different meetings with Cameron Crosby to help get a better understanding in how to tell this story. They only had three days to shoot this film and the bulk of the film takes place in one of the meeting rooms they actually attended. Thomas made sure to keep the exact same setup to make it feel authentic because normally there is no documentation of any meeting. In order to create a sense of community for his audience he needed to accurately create the atmosphere as well.

When collaborating with filmmakers, especially when discussing difficult subject matter, there is a support system that builds, when working with everyone without even realizing it. There are friendships that form when going through a creative process with others, even more so when the subject hits close to home. When getting into character, Crosby found it a bit challenging to get into the that headspace again, “To go into the headspace of the what if, what if that would happen to me and how I would react to it and like whether to move forward and try to get better.” Crosby gave an emotional, internalized performance because it came from such a personal space.

Courtesy of Superfan Pictures and Image Nation Films

Crosby wanted to be apart of a film that would send a positive message to anyone struggling, he was happy to work with Thomas because of all the care that went into the story,

“I think that’s an important message of the film just bc you take one step back doesn’t discount the 20 steps you made forward. Nothing was really uncomfortable because Phil set up such a great atmosphere, where I just felt safe and protected, which allowed me to get deeper and allowed me to get into that dark headspace.”

– Cameron Crosby, Cake Day

It’s incredibly important to have these honest conversations, where the filmmakers can go even deeper into the psyche of the character, to fully form a story that can be so personal. There is definitely a right way to tell these stories and that is what Cake Day does, it just captures this one day and expands upon the internal conflict of its lead character. Every aspect of the film, from the atmosphere to the fantastic score elevated the performances from the actors. It’s an important film that accurately depicts the struggle of being honest, not only with those around you, but with yourself.