Sweet Taste of Souls Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

Sweet Taste of Souls has a really unique concept that flips the moving picture frame trope on its head. When four struggling band members stop at a small roadside cafe for a slice of cherry pie, they find themselves imprisoned in the owner’s framed art collection. The film was intriguing from the very beginning and had refreshing moments for the supernatural subgenre in Horror.

Ms. Ellinore (Honey Loren) was heartbroken and defeated when her husband left her. She harnessed these supernatural powers to create a picture perfect life within her art collection, a life that she could never have. The film dives into the psychology of trauma and abuse, while adding a supernatural element to it. It is one of the most refreshing concepts because of how this complex, emotional story ties in with a trope we’ve never fully explored on screen.

Courtesy of Dark Coast Entertainment

The most impressive aspect of the film was the special effects and how they were used in certain scenes. There was a whole process in taking the souls of the characters and transferring into the frame, which was really interesting. It also felt really claustrophobic at times (which was a horrible feeling for me) which worked extremely well for the suspense of being locked inside of a frame.

Sweet Taste of Souls had great special effects, a really complex psychological story and sound design that elevated the story. It had great use of colour, especially the colour red, to pop against a faded background and make you remember that Ms. Ellinore was around the corner. It’s a very fun, original horror film, with a deep psychological exploration of trauma.

By Night’s End Review


By: Amanda Guarragi

By Night’s End is a crime thriller, centered around a husband and wife, who are struggling financially after suffering a death in the family. The tension between them, unfolds in an unprecedented way, as they discuss their issues, all while trying to survive an unexpected evening. The film slowly builds into the final action sequence and it is definitely worth it.

Director Walker Whited created an atmosphere surrounding the house that Heather (Michelle Rose) and Mark (Kurt Yeu) lived in. From the front, the house appeared smaller, quaint, isolated but the backyard was vast and seemed like it went on forever. The sense of impending doom seemed to grow, as Heather’s mood became worse and the night took a turn for the worst.

Courtesy of 3rd Shift Media and Wild Winn Pictures
Michelle Rose as Heather

What was very interesting was the dynamic between Heather and Mark. It’s almost as if they should not mesh well together as a couple because they are polar opposites, yet their relationship also worked. You could feel their resentment towards each other when they were arguing but then Mark’s softness, would break Heather’s tough exterior. It was great to watch their relationship unfold and learn more about who they were and how they got to this point in their lives.

By Night’s End has great lighting, camerawork and great fight choreography. It tests the couple to the maximum, as their relationship is put to the ultimate test, in trusting the other person. It discusses post traumatic stress disorder, grief, loss and survival, while having a couple navigate their way through a break in. It has great pacing, shocking moments and the score tied everything together nicely.